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Get started with living your best life today with my “Top 10 Ways to Feel Better Faster” There is some of my favourite essential oil hacks included. 

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I'm Sarah your Advocate for wellness. 
My aspiration is to share my knowledge and help you reclaim your health and happiness through the power of natural solutions. I want inspire other families on their own journey to create a healthy, non-toxic home and share with you my families stories and what we've learned along the way.  

Thank you!

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When I first heard the term “Sensory Diet” I wondered if this was some sort of fad diet I was going to put my son on? However, I soon learnt it had nothing to do with food at all. A sensory diet is an activity plan, carefully put together to provide sensory inputs into your child’s day. This helps them stay calm, focused and self-regulated (exactly what we need).  A good Occupational Therapist can design a sensory diet that is tailored to the specific needs of your child.

We started Chase on a sensory diet at the age of 3 and we have never looked back. It has had such an impact on his day to day behaviour. Over the years we have worked closely with Chase’s OT on the reasoning behind why he does certain activities and why his body responds to them. We incorporate these activities at home on a daily basis. I am happy to dedicate time to do these activities to help him keep calm, focused and regulated. We do a lot of Vestibular and Proprioceptive input (I will explain these big words later) which has a calming effect on his nervous system.

His sensory diet is forever changing to keep up with the changing needs of his sensory system. What worked last week, may not be effective this week. The same plan becomes boring and stale.

The great thing about a sensory diet is that you can tailor it and create your own diet to do at home. You don’t need expensive therapy tools and toys! You can use furniture, kids toys, and other objects found around the house. You can make it fun and get the whole family involved. My 5 year old daughter loves doing Chase’s sensory diet activities with him. It’s great for her as well to ward off her bad moods. Having a sibling or a parent doing the activities as well makes the child not feel like it’s a chore, or that you are doing these activities because there is something “wrong” with them. We make obstacle courses around the house, pretend to be spies in training, play “mini Olympics”, or the family favourite “The floor is lava!”

I have created a  7-Day Sensory Diet Program which I would love to share with you all.  Click here to download. It has everything you need to get started. I have also shared below a list I refer to when creating Chase’s sensory diet, so when you are ready you can try create your own.

Remember, always try and finish with some heavy lifting or weight-bearing activity, as this will calm the child at the end. I try and do at least 10 minutes, 3 times a day. Normally before school, straight after school and before bed. I get Chase involved in picking out the activities now that he’s older. We map them out on a whiteboard, so we can both follow along.

I am not a therapist or a doctor. I am simply the mother of a child with sensory needs, sharing some of our favourite sensory diet activities that we use daily.

Proprioceptive Activities

The Proprioceptive system is in our muscles and joints. It detects, and controls, force and pressure. Proprioceptive input can be very calming for those who are easily overwhelmed by sensory stimulation. It helps the body accurately sense where it is in relation to its surroundings. Activities include;

  • Crab walking
  • Push ups
  • Tug of War
  • Running races
  • Jumping on a trampoline
  • Carrying groceries
  • Pushing a wheelbarrow
  • Make a “body sandwich” between two pillows
  • Blow bubbles
  • Roll a large exercise ball up and down the wall
  • Scooter board on your stomach
  • Deep pressure hugs
  • Star jumps
  • Wheelbarrow races
  • Weighted blanket
  • Carry books
  • Knead Play-Doh
  • Do yoga (check out cosmic kids yoga on YouTube)
  • Leap frog
  • Hopscotch
  • Pillow fights
  • Rake leaves
  • Eat crunchy foods
  • Jump and crash into some pillows, bean bag or stuffed toys
  • Stress ball
  • Use a straw
  • Body sock
  • Crawl through tunnels
  • Bounce on a large exercise ball
  • Have a large exercise ball rolled over you

The Vestibular System

The Vestibular system is our movement system. The receptors are located in the inner ear and detect the speed and direction of movement, and changes in position of our head. It controls balance and eye movement. Activities include;

  • Go on a swing
  • Ride a rocking horse
  • Swing in a hammock
  • Ride a bike
  • Hang upside down
  • Play tunnel ball
  • Run in a large circle
  • Do somersaults
  • Use a seesaw
  • Dance around
  • Stand on a balance board
  • Swing on a rope
  • Play hopscotch
  • Walk on a balance beam or log
  • Kneel and push yourself on a scooter board
  • Play “Row Row Your Boat”
  • Play catch
  • Go down a slide
  • Do handstands
  • Climb a ladder

Tactile Input

The Tactile sense detects light touch, deep pressure, texture, temperature, vibration and pain. Activities include;

  • Play with sand
  • Play with a sensory tub filled with rice, beans, pebbles etc
  • Play with shaving cream
  • Finger paint
  • Foamy soap
  • Play in wet mud
  • Walk barefoot on grass or sand
  • Eat cold foods like ice, frozen drinks, or ice blocks
  • Play with modelling clay
  • Hug a vibrating pillow
  • Use a vibrating massager
  • Stand on a vibrating exercise plate
  • Play with slime
  • Play with squishy fidget toys (your local dollar store has a variety of these)
  • Pop bubble wrap (great when your online shopping arrives because its free)
  • Have a bubble bath
  • Create a sensory nature tub with bark, pebbles, leaves, feathers
  • Arts and craft
  • Vibrating pens

Auditory System

The Auditory system is responsible for the sense of hearing and our ability to take in information, process it, and produce an appropriate response. Activities include;

  • Listening to music
  • Play Chinese whispers
  • Blow whistles
  • Sing
  • Play musical instruments
  • Use a white noise machine
  • Humming
  • Wear noise cancelling headphones
  • Play “Bop It” (You can purchase this toy from Target, Big W or K Mart)
  • Echo microphone
  • Read aloud
  • Sound puzzles (Melissa and Doug have some good ones www.melissaanddoug.com)
  • Close your eyes and listen to the sounds around you. Nature, birds, the sound of traffic.
  • Clap a pattern and have your child try and repeat it
  • Ring a bell
  • Hammering
  • Snap your fingers
  • Clapping

Most importantly have fun while doing these activities!

Click on the link below to access my 7 day program for you to print and get started.

7 day sensory diet program by Sarah Brown

May 6, 2020

Why a sensory diet is so important

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PARTNER WITH ME

You will be so excited, you'll want to do more

the ripple effect

Let's help the people you love 
the most to be well 

Let's help you live 
happier & healthier

your journey starts here

Hey there beautiful,

get now!

Get started with living your best life today with my “Top 10 Ways to Feel Better Faster” There is some of my favourite essential oil hacks included. 

Free E-book

I'm Sarah your Advocate for wellness. 
My aspiration is to share my knowledge and help you reclaim your health and happiness through the power of natural solutions. I want inspire other families on their own journey to create a healthy, non-toxic home and share with you my families stories and what we've learned along the way.  

Thank you!

look for your freebie in your email